John Lawrence

Thumbnail image for Cheap Corn Permeates Every Facet of the American Diet

Cheap Corn Permeates Every Facet of the American Diet

by John Lawrence 04.09.2014 Culture

By John Lawrence

Corn is the staple of the US agricultural system and food supply. It’s in everything we eat unbeknownst to many Americans.

Corn feeds steers that become steak and fast food hamburgers. Corn feeds chickens and pigs - even catfish, salmon and tilapia. Milk, cheese and yogurt that once came from cows that grazed on grass now come from Holsteins that spend their time tethered to milking machines while munching on corn.

Processed foods contain even more corn than so-called “natural” foods. Take chicken nuggets, for example. Not only the chicken itself but the corn starch that holds it together, the corn flour in the batter, the corn oil in which its fried, the leavenings and lecithin, the mono-, di- and triglycerides, the golden coloring, the citric acid that keeps it fresh – all these ingredients come from corn.

Any soft drink in the supermarket including Coke and Pepsi contains High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) so you can wash down your corn with some more corn. A quarter of the 45,000 items in the average supermarket contain corn.

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Thumbnail image for Extreme Weather Watch: March 2014

Extreme Weather Watch: March 2014

by John Lawrence 04.03.2014 Business

Winter Weather Made a $55 Billion Hit to US Economy

By John Lawrence

The winter of 2014 broke records and budgets. NBC News reported that the economy took a $55 billion hit because of the extreme winter weather. There was $5.5 billion in damage to homes, businesses, agriculture and infrastructure. Cities had additional costs for salt for roads and asphalt for potholes. There were more than 30,000 potholes in Toledo, OH alone. The companies that supply salt and asphalt are making a fortune. This winter also saw 79.3 inches of snow falling in Chicago where there were 23 days below zero.

In California drought covers 99.8% of the state. The Sierra Nevada snowpack, which typically holds at least half of all the water that will flow to the state’s farms and cities each year, is at just one-fourth of its normal level.

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Thumbnail image for Big Data Renders College Diplomas Worthless; Billionaires Nonplussed

Big Data Renders College Diplomas Worthless; Billionaires Nonplussed

by John Lawrence 04.01.2014 Business

By John Lawrence

It used to be accepted without question that a college degree was necessary to get a good job, and over the course of a lifetime, you would make more money with a college degree than without one. But not so fast. Despite the propaganda put out by colleges who hope to profit off your matriculation, it turns out that the latest thing in hiring practices is to disregard the college degree altogether.

Companies like Xerox are hiring not based on your resume, which includes your degrees and work experience, but on a test they’ve devised which they claim is a better predictor of job performance. Xerox runs 175 call centers around the world. In all, the centers employ more than 50,000 customer service agents who deal with questions about everything from cellphone bills to health insurance.

Xerox was having a problem hiring the right people for the jobs and reducing turnover. So they hired a company to help them do a better job of finding the right people. This company studied the characteristics of those people already at Xerox who were successful at their jobs and came up with a test whose aim was to find new applicants with exactly those same characteristics.

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Thumbnail image for Outgoing CEO Paul Jacobs to Shareholders: Tell Your Congressman to Give Qualcomm a Tax Break!

Outgoing CEO Paul Jacobs to Shareholders: Tell Your Congressman to Give Qualcomm a Tax Break!

by John Lawrence 03.25.2014 Business

By John Lawrence

In his final message after more than eight years as chief executive officer of Qualcomm Inc. (QCOM), Paul Jacobs on March 4 gave shareholders what he called a “homework assignment.” “Send your Congress people your opinion that you’d like American companies to be able to bring offshore money back to the United States to either reinvest or return to shareholders”, said Jacobs, now executive chairman of the San Diego based chipmaker, which has $21.6 billion in overseas profits.

Paul could have said, “Go home and hug your wife and children” or “It’s been a pleasure being your CEO for 8 years and thank you for your work.” Or “tell your Congressman to raise the minimum wage” or “tell your Congressman to end homelessness now”, but, no, his solipsistic exhortation was all about making Qualcomm executives and shareholders (not employees mind you!) even richer than they already are.

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Thumbnail image for Putting Our Financial Well Being Above Our Children’s Ability to Survive a Warming Planet

Putting Our Financial Well Being Above Our Children’s Ability to Survive a Warming Planet

by John Lawrence 03.18.2014 Economy

By John Lawrence and Frank Thomas

Each year there are more extreme weather events not only in the US but all over the world. Most scientists agree that, as more carbon dioxide is pumped into the air and the gaseous composition of the atmosphere is changed, extreme weather events are more likely to happen.

As the earth warms due to greenhouse gasses (GHGs), polar and glacier ice melts and more moisture is held in the atmosphere which is deposited in torrents of precipitation. The Arctic permafrost and subsea waters contain over 1.7 trillion tons of methane which will be released as the earth warms further. This could lead to deadly injections of highly toxic methane reserves into the atmosphere in the relatively near future.

Just a 3% release over a short time, or 50 billion tons of methane, is the equivalent of 1 trillion tons of CO2 emissions … sufficient to ecologically destroy Mother Earth.

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Thumbnail image for Must Progress Come to a Screeching Halt To Save the Planet From Global Warming?

Must Progress Come to a Screeching Halt To Save the Planet From Global Warming?

by John Lawrence 03.07.2014 Activism

By John Lawrence

Ever since the Enlightenment, progress has been essential to civilization. Defined as steady improvement toward a goal, the progress of society or civilization has been synonymous with growth, inventions, growing gross domestic product.

The very US Constitution was a testament to the Enlightenment era notion of progress. Science and technology would create the conditions for the “pursuit of happiness.” Every day in every way human society would get better and better. Only now we’re at a crossroads where the very idea of progress and in particular continued progress is contributing to the destruction of the planet.

The more progress we have, the more growth of GDP, the more greenhouse gases (GHGs) are spewed into the atmosphere and the more our planetary ecology is corrupted. Progress as we’ve known it must come to a screeching halt or the planet is in jeopardy of becoming uninhabitable by the human species.

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Thumbnail image for Extreme Weather Watch: February 2014 – Nowhere To Hide

Extreme Weather Watch: February 2014 – Nowhere To Hide

by John Lawrence 03.05.2014 Environment

By John Lawrence

USA Today did a report: Nowhere to hide from extreme weather.  As it turns out, the US is uniquely positioned for extreme weather whether it’s hurricanes in the southeast, tornadoes in the lower plains, noreasters along the eastern seaboard, wildfires in the west, earthquakes, volcanoes and possible tsunamis along the west coast.

And then there are sinkholes in Florida, avalanches in the Rockies and flash floods in the Appalachians. Hail, ice storms and lake-effect snowstorms far from the Great Lakes round out the list. No matter where you go, you will meet extreme weather. Especially now that storms are almost continent wide. Each storm in February affected about 150 million people, half the population of the US.

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Thumbnail image for Public Banking – Part 5: San Diego Could Benefit From a Public Bank

Public Banking – Part 5: San Diego Could Benefit From a Public Bank

by John Lawrence 02.26.2014 Business

City of San Diego Sending Billions of Dollars to Wall Street Needlessly

By John Lawrence

Public banks are financial institutions owned by government entities, such as cities, states, and nations. Establishment of a Public Bank of San Diego would return millions in profits to the City instead of winding up in Wall Street bankers’ private pockets.

Each year the City of San Diego deposits millions of dollars of city revenues in Wall Street banks. The budget for 2014 General Fund Revenues is $1.2 billion. That includes revenues from property taxes, sales taxes, Transient Occupancy Taxes and Franchise Fees among other things. That money has to be deposited somewhere. The City pays these banks transaction fees and loses whatever interest might be gained if the City of San Diego deposited the money in its own public bank with profits earned deposited in the City’s general fund.

Under the current arrangement, interest earnings for the projected 2014 budget are a pathetic 0.1%. Why? Because the Wall Street banks earn most of the interest on the deposited City revenues and pay out interest to the City bordering on zero. Revenues from interest to the City alone could be millions of dollars, and interest the City pays out could be effectively be reduced to zero if the City of San Diego owned its own bank.

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Thumbnail image for A Challenge to Kevin Faulconer: End Homelessness Now

A Challenge to Kevin Faulconer: End Homelessness Now

by John Lawrence 02.18.2014 Editor's Picks

By John Lawrence

You kibitz with the homeless in your campaign ads. Now that you’re Mayor Kevin Faulconer, are you really going to do anything about it? Or are you going to continue to procrastinate. Other cities are ending homelessness from Phoenix to Salt Lake City to Nashville.

You have the model to follow. It’s a no-brainer. You don’t have to reinvent the wheel. Just follow their successful models. You don’t have to continue to study the problem in order to address it ten years from now.

These cities and others have decided that treatment and supportive services should not be conditions or precursors to permanent housing. Instead, the very ability to address personal mental health goals, beat addiction and gain stable employment stems from the safety and stability that comes from having a permanent home. This approach is called Housing First.

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Thumbnail image for Extreme Weather Watch: January 2014 – 30 million Americans Had Flights Canceled or Delayed

Extreme Weather Watch: January 2014 – 30 million Americans Had Flights Canceled or Delayed

by John Lawrence 02.05.2014 Environment

By John Lawrence

More than 49,000 flights were canceled and another 300,000 delayed in January as airlines lost $75 million to $150 million because of costs such as deicing jets as well as lost revenue. 30 million people had their flights canceled or delayed.

Flight cancellations cost passengers an extra $2.5 billion in meals and extra hotel bills in January alone. Many stranded passengers had to wait days — and in a few extreme case up to a week — to get a seat on a flight out.

After viewing the Super Bowl many fans had their flights home canceled. Even the victorious Seattle Seahawks experienced flight disruptions. Their charter flight was delayed by a snowstorm in Newark, NJ. After a couple of hours on the tarmac, the plane finally took off, only to be diverted to Minneapolis. They finally made it home hours after their scheduled arrival time.

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Thumbnail image for Concert and CD Review: The North at Dizzy’s

Concert and CD Review: The North at Dizzy’s

by John Lawrence 02.03.2014 Culture

By John Lawrence

On Saturday, February 1, a trio group called “The North” played San Diego’s premiere jazz club, Dizzy’s, just off the I-5 in Pacific Beach. It was a pre-release party for their album, “Slow Down (This Isn’t the Mainland)” which is officially due out April 15 although albums were available at the club. The group consists of Romain Collin, piano, Shawn Conley, bass, and Abe Lagrimas Jr, drums.

Recorded in Hawaii, and dedicated to Oahu’s north shore (hence the name), they mainly created a mellow, laid back sound. No hard-edged New York City vibe here. As such the music should be very accessible for the average listener but not so much for the die hard jazz fan. One person’s “laid back” is another person’s “nuthin much happenin.”

The group performed the tunes they had recorded on the album, naturally.  The most successful tune even more so in concert than on the album was Bob Dylan’s “Blowin’ in the Wind.” The group’s exquisite rendering was almost prayerful and churchlike. They tried quite successfully to incorporate folk music in their ouvre.

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Thumbnail image for The Real Job Creators in San Diego: The US Military and the Military-Industrial Complex

The Real Job Creators in San Diego: The US Military and the Military-Industrial Complex

by John Lawrence 01.31.2014 Battle for Barrio Logan

By John Lawrence

In 1961 President Eisenhower warned us about the military-industrial complex (MIC). He said, “We annually spend on military security more than  the net income of all United States corporations.” Since then spending on the military and the MIC has only skyrocketed. Taken together, they, not the rich, are the main job creators in the US. If you graduate from high school and can’t get a job, no problem.

The military will accept you with open arms, provide you with on-the-job training, even give you a signing bonus. Why stand in an unemployment line or apply for a job along with 500 other applicants? Or go into debt to attend some schlock college?

If you’re a college graduate and can’t get hired, try the MIC: the NSA, the CIA, Lockheed Martin, Boeing, Northrop Grumman, General Dynamics – they’re the real job creators.

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Thumbnail image for College Graduates Beg for a Shrinking Pool of Jobs

College Graduates Beg for a Shrinking Pool of Jobs

by John Lawrence 01.11.2014 Economy

PhDs Go Begging, Microsoft Lays Off High Tech Workers, Graduates Not Able to Cope with Student Loan Debt Getting Jobs as Baristas…

By John Lawrence

…That’s the new reality for today’s college graduates.

Have America’s young people been sold a bill of goods? They thought that a college degree guaranteed them an entry to a good middle class life. Many are now finding out that that’s not the case as they struggle to pay student loans and try to cope with an anemic jobs market. For-profit colleges are advertising on TV in order to perpetuate the myth that a college education is a panacea. Even President Obama spouts that everyone should go to college, saying that’s what will cure the nation’s ills and prevent us from falling into the abyss of national mediocrity.

But don’t count on it.

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Thumbnail image for Challenge to San Diego: End Homelessness in 2014

Challenge to San Diego: End Homelessness in 2014

by John Lawrence 01.06.2014 Activism

Phoenix and Salt Lake City have ended chronic homelessness among veterans. Why can’t San Diego follow their example?

By John Lawrence

Phoenix has become the first city to end homelessness among veterans. The Obama administration had set a goal of ending homelessness among veterans by 2015, but Phoenix reached that mark a year early. After housing the last 56 veterans a week before Christmas, Phoenix announced that it had eradicated chronic homelessness among veterans in that city. Phoenix and Salt Lake City had been involved in a frierndly competition to see which city could end chronic homelessness among veterans first. Phoenix won, but Salt Lake was not far behind.

The fact that Phoenix and Salt Lake City Mayors had gotten involved in the homeless issue was a significant reason why this problem has been solved in those cities. In an effort to raise awareness about veteran homelessness, Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker proclaimed November “Housing Veterans Month.” In response, roughly 40 landlords contacted the city to say they had units available for veterans. Becker had also engaged Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton in a friendly competition to see whose city could end chronic veteran homelessness first.

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Thumbnail image for Global Warming: How to Kick the Fossil Fuel Habit – Part 2

Global Warming: How to Kick the Fossil Fuel Habit – Part 2

by John Lawrence 01.03.2014 Environment

By John Lawrence

This series of articles is based on an excellent book by Tom Rand: “Kick the Fossil Fuel Habit- 10 Clean Technologies to Save Our World.”  InPart 1 we dealt with all the possibilities for solar power generation.  In this article we will consider wind.  For centuries wind powered ships and windmills drew water out of the ground.  We are now in a position to reconnect with this form of energy and convert it into electricity.  How it works is very simple:  As the wind blows, enough force is created to spin a turbine which in turn generates electrical energy.  These days a single wind turbine can power a decent sized town.

The US Department of Energy has calculated that wind could generate 15 times the total world energy use.  That’s 15 times all the energy generated by oil, coal and nuclear at the present time.  Even oil magnate T. Boone Pickens has called the US the “Saudi Arabia of wind.”

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Thumbnail image for Extreme Weather Watch: December 2013 – Power Outages, Canceled Flights, Bitter Cold, Freezing Rain

Extreme Weather Watch: December 2013 – Power Outages, Canceled Flights, Bitter Cold, Freezing Rain

by John Lawrence 01.02.2014 Environment

By John Lawrence

Snow, sleet, freezing rain and extreme cold left millions of people without power in the US, Canada and western Europe. December 2013 was packed full of bitter cold, snowy and icy extremes which resulted in pile-ups on the highways, canceled flights and people trying to survive bitter cold with no heat in their homes.

Winter Storm Cleon produced a significant bout of freezing rain and sleet across the Dallas-Ft. Worth area Dec. 5-6. Freezing rain and sleet accumulations of up to 1.5 inches led to nasty travel conditions. Hundreds of flights were canceled by the icy weather. In addition, more than a quarter million customers were without power in northern Texas.

The first phase of Winter Storm Cleon hammered parts of northeast Minnesota with heavy snow Dec. 2-4. Two Harbors, Michigan took the title as the location that had the most snow from Cleon with a total of 35.6 inches. Just down the road in Duluth, Minnesota, Cleon dumped 23.3 inches of snow. This was the sixth largest three day snowfall total on record in the city.

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Thumbnail image for An Analysis of The City of San Diego’s Climate Action Plan

An Analysis of The City of San Diego’s Climate Action Plan

by John Lawrence 12.20.2013 Editor's Picks

By John Lawrence

The City of San Diego has developed an elaborate Climate Action Plan (CAP), the goal of which is to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

The County of San Diego has one too as does the City of Chula Vista as does the Port of San Diego as does SANDAG as does the University of California at San Diego as does the San Diego County Water Authority. In fact, as mandated by the state, almost every political jurisdiction in the state has developed a CAP. The CAPs in general are long on bureaucracy and time frames and short on specific mandates and orders for compliance.

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Thumbnail image for Extreme Weather Watch: November 2013 – Super Typhoon Hits Phillipines, Tornadoes Wipe Out Another Midwest Town

Extreme Weather Watch: November 2013 – Super Typhoon Hits Phillipines, Tornadoes Wipe Out Another Midwest Town

by John Lawrence 12.05.2013 Environment

by John Lawrence

Super Typhoon Haiyan

Super Typhoon Haiyan, the largest typhoon to hit land in human history, impacted the Phillipines on November 7 with winds exceeding 200 miles per hour along with torrential rain. The lives of 25 million people were affected. As many as 10,000 may have lost their lives. It was the equivalent of a Category 5 hurricane, and the only difference between it and a hurricane was its name. Hurricanes are called typhoons in certain parts of the world and cyclones in others. Since they are the same weather phenomenon, why confuse people? In this era of globalization let’s globalize the names too and call them all hurricanes.

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Thumbnail image for Public Banking: How a Public Bank Could Benefit San Diego – Part 4

Public Banking: How a Public Bank Could Benefit San Diego – Part 4

by John Lawrence 12.05.2013 Business

By John Lawrence

In this fourth part of our series on Public Banking (check out Parts 1 – 3 herehere and here), we explore how a Public Bank could benefit the taxpayers and citizens of the City of San Diego.

To recapitulate, the Public Bank of San Diego (BSD) would be owned by the City of San Diego and would provide functions similar to the Bank of North Dakota which is the nation’s only public bank as of this date. All BSD deposits would be guaranteed by the full faith and credit of the City of San Diego.

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Thumbnail image for Global Warming: How to Kick the Fossil Fuel Habit – Part 1

Global Warming: How to Kick the Fossil Fuel Habit – Part 1

by John Lawrence 11.07.2013 Activism

By John Lawrence

This article is based on an excellent book by Tom Rand: “Kick the Fossil Fuel Habit - 10 Clean Technologies to Save Our World.” It contains great information at a reading level that even an elementary school child can comprehend. And there are many superb pictures too. It is a wonderful resource in the numerous technologies that are in the process of ridding the world of fossil fuels – some of them hardly known to the literate public. At least I wasn’t aware of them, and I consider myself somewhat knowledgeable about global warming and what we can do about it. He identifies ten different technologies. We will devote an article to each of them. Part 1 will deal with solar.

Most everyone is aware of solar panels. The sun provides the earth with an enormous amount of energy which we are learning how to convert into energy to power our cars and our homes. A square yard of desert absorbs as much energy over a year as you can get out of a barrel of oil. In fact a barrel of oil contains energy from the sun that was absorbed millenia ago and stored as fossils. An area of desert the size of the state of Connecticut absorbs enough energy to replace the entire oil output of the OPEC countries. The technology to convert this energy to power output useful to humans is available today.

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Thumbnail image for Extreme Weather Watch: October 2013 – Fires Burn Down Australia

Extreme Weather Watch: October 2013 – Fires Burn Down Australia

by John Lawrence 11.01.2013 Environment

By John Lawrence

Australia has had its hottest year on record, and the warm temperatures combined with dry conditions have sent over 100 wildfires whipping across the southeastern Australian state of New South Wales. The fires have caused a deep haze to descend over Sydney, Australia’s largest city, and spurred the deployment of more than 1500 firefighters across the region. Hundreds of homes were either burned or damaged. The fires impacted 82 of Australia’s parks and protected areas, including the Blue Mountains, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. More than 311,000 acres were burned in New South Wales, and damage is set to exceed $100 million.

The newly reopened NASA Earth Observatory reported that temperatures up to 93°F and winds gusting to 56 mph helped fan the flames. Conditions over the past six months also played a key role. This past September was Australia’s hottest on record and kept the country on pace for a record-breaking year. Average temperatures in New South Wales were a whopping 6.1°F above the September norm. It was the country’s warmest 12-month period on record as well. Maximum temperatures were even more extreme, measuring 8.3°F above normal. The fires also came unusually  early — October is still the springtime in Australia as Australia is south of the equator and has seasons opposite to ours. Springtime or no, the region was primed to burn. The hotter summer months are still ahead!

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Thumbnail image for Extreme Weather Watch: September 2013, Floods in Boulder and Mexico

Extreme Weather Watch: September 2013, Floods in Boulder and Mexico

by John Lawrence 10.08.2013 Environment

By John Lawrence

Boulder, CO -The rain began to fall on Monday, September 9. Experts would ultimately call it a 1,000-year rain and a 100-year flood. By Thursday September 12, Little James Creek began ripping buildings from their foundations and sending roofs plunging into basements. Roads were closed and still the rain kept coming.

In the city of Boulder, Boulder Creek was roaring at a rate of 3,104 cubic feet per second, according to Boulder police Chief Mark Beckner. Two days before, it had been flowing at a leisurely 54 cfs.

At 1:40 AM on Thursday University of Colorado officials issued a text alert ordering faculty and staff residents living in university housing near Boulder Creek to evacuate. Soon, CU and the Boulder Valley School District would both announce they were closing down.

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Thumbnail image for Another View of Robert Reich’s Inequality for All

Another View of Robert Reich’s Inequality for All

by John Lawrence 10.07.2013 Business

By John Lawrence

This is Robert Reich’s latest venture in an attempt to inform the American public about what’s really going on with the economy in this society. He’s tried everything else: Chancellor’s Professor of Public Policy at the University of California at Berkeley in which he teaches a course on Wealth and Poverty, a blog, where he had as many as 300 comments after each post until he shut down the comments due to a persistent vile and threatening commenter who stooped to anti-semitic comments, 13 books, the latest being “Beyond Outrage,” Secretary of Labor in the Clinton Administration, radio and TV appearances, lectures.

He also worked in the Ford and Carter administrations. Reich has always been concerned about those who are struggling to keep their heads above water, and in today’s world that includes almost all of the former members of the middle class.

The major metaphor in the film is a suspension bridge which fits perfectly over a graph of the concentration of wealth that occurred at two points in American history, the first being in 1928 and the second being in 2008. These are the two high points of the suspension bridge and correspond to the two points of peak inequality in American society after which there was a crash: the Great Depression and the Great Recession.

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Thumbnail image for Opening of the New San Diego Central Library: a Grand and Glorious Occasion

Opening of the New San Diego Central Library: a Grand and Glorious Occasion

by John Lawrence 09.29.2013 Arts

Saturday, Sept. 28, will go down in San Diego history as the day the much awaited central library opened in San Diego.

The opening ceremonies started at 11 a.m. and lasted for about an hour. All sorts of dignitaries were seated on the platform, and many of them spoke. The event was presided over by Mayor pro tem Todd Gloria. The gay men’s chorus warmed up the crowd as if they needed any warming on such a beautiful sunny San Diego day. The navy band did their John Philip Sousa thing and the children’s choir sang the national anthem.

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Thumbnail image for Public Banking: The Antidote to Wall Street’s Domination of the Economy – Part 3

Public Banking: The Antidote to Wall Street’s Domination of the Economy – Part 3

by John Lawrence 09.25.2013 Business

When states and municipalities set up public banks, money and hence energy is withdrawn from Wall Street creating the perfect revolution with the result that the husk of Wall Street shrivels up and dies like a plant deprived of nutrients … without a shot being fired.

By John Lawrence

Nothing could be less radical than a public bank because the state of North Dakota already has one and it has been working successfully for the citizens of North Dakota. No one would accuse North Dakotans of being socialists or would they? No new ground to break here!

Instead of money leaving the state and going to Wall Street, money stays in the state where it is lent out in the form of student and business loans with the profits being shared by the citizens of North Dakota instead of going into the pockets of private bankers in New York.

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